EOD learns by building IEDs

A 914th Civil Engineer member demonstrates hot to create and improvised explosive device at a training on base, August 11, 2016. The week-long training was held to teach members how to identify and dismantle IEDs. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Richard Mekkri/released)

A 914th Civil Engineer member demonstrates hot to create and improvised explosive device at a training on base, August 11, 2016. The week-long training was held to teach members how to identify and dismantle IEDs. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Richard Mekkri/released)

Tech. Sgt. Aaron Clark, EOD team leader, 914th Airlift Wing Civil Engineer Squadron, creates components for a fake improvised explosive device during training on base, August 11, 2016. The exercise was held to teach members how to identify and dismantle IEDs. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Richard Mekkri/released)

Tech. Sgt. Aaron Clark, EOD team leader, 914th Airlift Wing Civil Engineer Squadron, creates components for a fake improvised explosive device during training on base, August 11, 2016. The exercise was held to teach members how to identify and dismantle IEDs. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Richard Mekkri/released)

NIAGARA FALLS AIR RESERVE STATION --

 

    During the week of August 8-12, 2016 the 914th Airlift Wing Civil Engineer Squadron Explosive

Ordnance Disposal unit hosted an advanced improvised explosive device electronics course on base.

      “In order to take IEDs apart, you generally need to know how to build them,” said Chief Master Sgt.

Jason Knapp, flight chief, 914th EOD. “They’re learning everything from basic electronic theory to

advanced IED electronics.”

    After the hands-on training, the EOD instructors will be better able to implement more realistic

devices in their trainings similar to what would be seen in a deployed location.

    “I’m here to teach these guys how the bad guys have made their stuff before, how they’re making it

now, and what they’re planning on in the future,” said Phillip C. Sampson, lead instructor for the

training. “Then I’ll have them build their own IEDs so that they know how to disarm them.”

    According to Sampson, at the end of the week-long course members will be able to identify, replicate,

and use for training, any of the devices that have been used in the past with what is currently being used

in today’s warfare.

    The week-long course had close to 20 participants from both active duty and reserve units as well as

representation from the Erie County Bomb Squad. Members in attendance were from Seymour-Johnson

Air Force Base, Scott Air Force Base, and McGuire Air Force Base.